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William H. Gass is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and David May Distinguished University Professor in the Humanities at Washington University in St. Louis. He is an acclaimed author and critic. For his novels and stories, he has been honored with the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters Award for Fiction, the American Book Award, and the PEN/Nabokov Lifetime Achievement award. For his unique blend of philosophy, literary criticism, and belles lettres, he has received the National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism and the Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism. His book on translation, Reading Rilke, has become a classic reference for discussing poetry in translation.

 

laytonRichard Layton is Associate Professor of Religion at UIUC, with an affiliate appointment in Medieval Studies. Professor Layton specializes in Christianity. His main research interests include History and Receoption of the Bible, the development of early Christianity, and philosophy and religion in the Greco-Roman World. Books written include For the Civic Good: The Liberal Case for Teaching Religion in the Public Schools (The New Public Scholarship) (Forthcoming, 2013) co-authored with Walter Feinberg; and Didymus the Blind and His Circle in Late-Antique Alexandria: Virtue and Narrative in Biblical Scholarship (2004).

 

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Suzanne Jill Levine is a leading translator of Latin American literature, and a professor at the University of California in Santa Barbara where she directs a Translation Studies doctoral program. Her scholarly and critical works include her award-winning literary biography Manuel Puig and the Spider Woman and her groundbreaking book on the poetics of translation The Subversive Scribe: Translating Latin American Fiction. She has just completed a five-volume project as general editor of the works of Borges for Penguin Classics.

 

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Adam Phillips is a psychoanalyst, literary critic, and essayist. In addition to his scholarly work on such figures as Edmund Burke, Charles Lamb, John Clare, and Walter Pater, he is the author of many well-regarded books of essays on the inner life. His provocative prose, intellectual range, and powers of insight have earned him the label “the Emerson of our time” (John Banville). Phillips is visiting professor at the University of York, a frequent contributor to the London Review of Books, and the editor of the New Penguin Freud.

 

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Gregory Rabassa, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the City University of New York, is the renowned translator of Gabriel García Márquez and winner of the National Medal of the Arts. Rabassa been called the “the translator’s translator” (Thomas Hoeksema) and was praised by Márquez himself as “the best Latin American writer in the English language.” His book, If This be Treason: Translation and its Dyscontents won the PEN/Martha Albrand award for the art of the memoir.

 

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David Rosenberg is a poet and essayist, biblical scholar and translator, editor and cultural critic. In a series of biographies of Biblical figures (Abraham, David, Moses, and Jesus) and translations of the Hebrew Bible—now collected together in the volume A Literary Bible: An Original Translation (2009)—Rosenberg has worked to recover the authorial voices, historical continuities, secular dimensions, and poetic power of a work long obscured by textual revision and interpretive orthodoxy. The poetic inspiration and interpretive depth of his radical retranslations have won Rosenberg acclaim: his translations have appeared in Harper’s, The New Republic, Hudson Review, Paris Review, Chicago Review, American Poetry Review, and The Nation; "Blues of the Sky" (1974), his translations of parts of the Book of Psalms, was the first small press mimeo book ever reviewed in the New York Times Book Review; "A Poet's Bible" (1991) was the first biblical translation in English to win a major literary award, the PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Translation Prize for 1992. His translations of the Hebrew Bible have now been translated from Rosenberg's English directly into titles published in Spanish, Italian, Dutch, Portuguese, and even back into Modern Hebrew! Rosenberg, who has taught literature and creative writing at CUNY, The New School, Princeton, was recently named a Guggenheim fellow in creative non-fiction. His book in progress, A Life in A Poem: Memoir of a Rebellious Bible Translator, will reveal translation as a triple task of scholarly acumen, literary craft, and cultural provocation. Click here for for more on Rosenberg.

 

 

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Rainer Schulte is the Director of the Center for Translation Studies at the University of Texas at Dallas and founding editor of Translation Review, a journal dedicated to the critical and scholarly aspects of translation studies. He has edited several anthologies of contemporary international literature and written numerous studies on the craft and theory of literary translation, including his co-edited book with John Biguenet, The Craft of Translation.

 

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Joyce Tolliver is Associate Professor of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese at UIUC, with affiliate appointments in Translation Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Gender and Women's Studies. Tolliver is a scholar of modern Spanish literature and culture, whose work focuses on the role of gender and race in the cultural discourses of the modern Spanish Empire. Her books include "El encaje roto" y otros cuentos/"Torn Lace" and Other Stories, published in the MLA Texts and Translations Series; Cigar Smoke and Violet Water: Gendered Discourse in the Stories of Emilia Pardo Bazán (Bucknell, 1998); and Disciplines on the Line: Feminist Research on Spanish, Latin American, and U.S. Spanish Women (Juan de la Cuesta, 2004). She teaches translation theory and practice.